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<4.

On a summer’s day in 2017, Charles Ramoz-Ramírez was chairing a meeting of the six most senior employees of the HR consultancy he established almost five years ago. His decision to establish the consultancy was an extremely difficult one for him, as he held a senior, well-paid and secure position as an HR executive within a Multi-National Corporation (MNC) based in New York. This HR position within the MNC involved training and developing professional executive staff such as engineers and project managers to undertake overseas assignments mainly in Spanish-speaking countries in South America.
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At this meeting with his senior staff, Charles reminded them about the history of consultancy for which they now work. He reminded them that there were two main reasons which underpinned his decision to leave the employment of the MNC and set up the consultancy business. First, he found himself being invited to deliver, on an increasingly frequent basis, specialized training sessions on expatriate programs organized by independent training organizations and even other MNCs. He concluded from the frequency of these requests that there was a scarcity of HR professionals who possessed genuine expertise in preparing US executives for assignments in Mexico. Second, he did not agree with his HR director’s view of expatriate training which was very much a case of ‘send them and see’. That is, his HR director did not doubt that pre-departure training for expatriates was helpful, but she did not see it as a critical success factor. Charles’s view was that pre-departure training of expatriates was not just helpful; he saw it as a prerequisite for any overseas assignment no matter what its duration. His belief in the value of pre-departure training thus became a key operating principle of the CRR Expatriate Development consultancy organization which he formed on the day he left the employment of the MNC. In essence, Charles established a consultancy which aimed to design and deliver in-house pre-departure training programs for employees of US MNCs who would be taking up assignments in Spanish-speaking countries in South America.
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After reminding his senior staff of how the consultancy came into being, Charles explained to them that a recent event had served to convince him that the emphasis he placed on the training of expatriates was fully justified. Charles informed them that he had recently been approached by the current HR director of the MNC which had previously employed him. (The previous HR director for whom Charles worked had retired approximately two years ago.) The current HR director told Charles that, over the last 12 months, the senior management of the MNC had become increasingly concerned about the general failure of its expatriate workforce to adjust to life in Mexico. As a result, the HR department had commissioned an independent training needs analysis. Part of this analysis was based on responses from 40 engineers who had returned home in the last two years from assignments in Mexico. Charles proceeded to inform his staff about the findings of this analysis which were supplied to him by the HR director of the MNC.
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The independent analysis provided a fascinating insight into the pre-departure training that the 40 employees had received. Notably, only 25 of them had received any formal pre-departure training at all. Subsequent investigations revealed no obvious explanation as to why the remaining 15 staff had received no formal training. Further, when the MNC’s training records were examined, they showed that the duration of the training received by the 25 staff varied tremendously. See Table 1.
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1 to 5 days 6 to 10 days 11 to 15 days More than 15 days
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Number of employees 6 3 11 5
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Again, organizational records offered no obvious explanation as to why these 25 employees received training which varied so much in terms of duration.
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The training needs analysis document proceeded to report further information about the nature of the pre-departure training received by the group of 25 employees. The 25 employees experienced various pre-departure training methods such as lectures and tutorials including basic language classes, access to online material about Mexico, and cultural awareness workshops delivered by an outside training agency. Prior to their assignments, four of the 25 employees were offered the opportunity to undertake seven-day field visits to Mexico. These visits enabled them to meet colleagues already based in Mexico and to visit organizations and places in Mexico that were linked to their assignments. The variation in the pre-departure training received by the 25 employees made it difficult to evaluate the employees’ views about the effectiveness of the pre-departure training they had received. Some anecdotal evidence presented in the analysis did, however, indicate that seven employees who accessed online training material found it to be of little value in terms of cultural preparation for their assignments.
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Finally, with an eye on future training, the 40 employees who had returned from assignments in Mexico were asked to identify the two biggest challenges that they had faced when working in Mexico. A summary of their responses to this question is presented in Table 2.
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Biggest Challenge’ Number of employees citing this challenge*
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Communication problems with local workers 28
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Technical issues relating to their work 15
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Traveling within Mexico 10
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Health and diet issues 10
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Accommodation issues 6
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Loneliness/boredom 4
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Safety including crime 3
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Pressure from family in USA 2
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Other challenges cited by only one employee 2
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Questions;
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1. Assume that you are a member of the senior team of CRR Expatriate Development. On the basis on the case study material and also your wider knowledge of the subject area, highlight what you think should be included in the content of the new ten-day pre-departure program for the 30 engineers and project managers.
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2. Having drawn up your list of the essential elements of this program, (a) explain why you think that each element is necessary, and (b) state how much program time you would devote to each element.
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3. Assuming that you were permitted access to the 40 employees who have already completed their assignments in Mexico, state what further information you would seek from them to help you to design the ten-day pre-departure program.
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4. Highlight what further information you would seek about (a) the 30 engineers and project managers, and (b) their forthcoming assignments in Mexico, before finalizing the design and content of the pre-departure program.
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5. Explain how you would seek to augment the content of a program, such as the one you are proposing, with ongoing cultural training during an expatriate’s assignment.
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<br />4.

As you answer the five questions provided, be sure and include specific and realistic solutions or changes that are needed. Evaluate the pertinent segments of the case study. Analyze what is working and what is not working. Support your proposed solutions with solid and substantive evidence including information from the course textbook, discussions and the weekly lessons presented thus far in our course.

<br />Assemble the specific strategies that you propose for accomplishing the solutions. Recommend any further action that should be taken. In essence, what should be done and who should do it and why should they do this?

<br />In 1996, Danone, the giant French food company, entered into a joint venture for bottled water with Hangzhou Wahaha—a leading Chinese milk-based beverage company originally owned by Hangzhou city government but controlled by a local entrepreneur Zong Qinghou.

<br />Wahaha owned 49 percent of the new venture (in exchange for contributing its trademark and four out of ten subsidiaries), with Danone and Peregrine (a Hong-Kong investment company) holding the rest. Following the 1998 Asian financial crisis, Danone bought out Peregrine's share and took control of the JV’s board—but Mr. Zong continued to run the JV operations. Within just a few years, Wahaha became the leading bottled water brand in China—but the JV collapsed in 2007 amid unusually bitter recriminations between the two partners.

<br />Danone accused Wahaha of competing with the JV through its other subsidiaries controlled by Zong’s family but sharing the same trademark and distribution network. In turn, Wahaha accused Danone of competing against the JV by investing in other local beverage companies, and that Danone’s part-time representatives on the board did not understand the reality of business in China. Indeed, when Danone attempted to take a legal action against Zong, it came out that the authorities never approved the original trademark transfer. After Zong resigned from the JV, the employees refused to recognize the authority of the new chairman appointed by Danone. To settle the dispute, Danone sold its interests in what has become nearly $2 billion business back to Wahaha at a substantial discount to its market value.

<br />Questions:

<br />1. Initially considered only as means of securing market access, alliances today are an integral part of global strategies in all parts of the value chain. What alliances are needed to generate new knowledge that deems increasingly important?

<br />2. Alliances are mostly transitional entities; therefore, longevity is a poor measure of success. The aim is not to preserve the alliance at all costs but how to contribute to the organizations competitive position?

<br />3. There are four types of alliances: complementary, learning, resource, and competitive. Alliances are dynamic, migrating from one strategic orientation to another. Very few alliances remain complementary for long. Alliances among competitors are increasingly frequent, but they are also the most complex and why?

<br />4. The approach to HRM alliance depends largely on the strategic objectives of the partnership. How can a focus on managing the interfaces with the parent organization, as well as managing and leading internal stakeholders inside the alliance itself?

<br />5. The firm’s HRM skills and reputation are assets when exploring and negotiating alliances. The greater the expected value from the alliance, the more HR function support is required, why?

<br />

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<please ensure that all sources cited are referenced and only reference sources cited.

Please ensure that the questions are read properly so that they can be completely answered
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Please pay attention to the grading rubrics so that you can understand how marks are allocated for each question.
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Please ensure that all sources cited are referenced and only reference sources cited.
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Please use the textbook for this course if it is relevant as it pertains to information on the contents needed to answer the questions successfully. Link for textbook: https://silo.tips/download/international-human-resource-management-4th-edition
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The case study was uploaded so that you can have an idea as to what Yarn Paradise is about.
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In the discusiion questions uploaded there is a section highlighted as NB. which is where I gave a synopsis as to what answers I gave for earlier exercises that were given on the same case study which I completed earlier in the course (for example DQ 1-1, DQ 3-1, etc).

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In addition, you must appropriately cite all resources used in your response and document them in a bibliography using apa style.

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Instructions
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Activity 4: Employee Relations and Workforce Planning (100 points)
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Your Activity responses should be both grammatically and mechanically correct and formatted in the same fashion as the Activity itself. If there is a Part A, your response should identify a Part A, etc. In addition, you must appropriately cite all resources used in your response and document them in a bibliography using APA style. (100 points) (A 4-page response is required.)
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Scenario:
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Yarn Paradise is a micro-MNE. In DQ 1-1, as an HR Director, you determined its likely next stage of growth and the potential Human Resource challenges stemming from further growth. In this activity, you will utilize the same scenario. Your CEO has come to you asking you to evaluate the best countries for which Yarn Paradise can begin an expansion effort. Additionally, unions will inevitably be a significant consideration in determining where and how to expand. You will need to carefully research two countries of your choice and compare them in terms of which would be best for Yarn Paradise.
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Part A (30 points)
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Compare union relations in two major countries. How are the unions (and employers) organized? What is the nature and role of bargaining? What role does the government play? Are there additional forms of employee representation?
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Part B (30 points)
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Utilizing Hofstede’s dimensions, compare and contrast the 2 countries at the website, https://www.hofstede-insights.com/product/compare-countries/
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You may use a table or chart to show the significant differences and similarities.
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Finally, which country would you recommend to your CEO for Yarn Paradise’s expansion?
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Part C (30 points)
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What problems do you see for Yarn Paradise in bargaining with unions in these countries? How would you advise those problems be resolved? What do you predict for the future of unions and union relations in the global economy, and how specifically would this apply to your chosen country for expansion? Why?
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NB.
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Please ensure APA 7 is used
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2. Please cite all sources used
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3. In the reference section please only reference the sources cited in the paper
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4. Please pay careful attention to the grading rubric so that you can have an idea as to how marks are allocated for each section of the paper
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5. Please use the textbook for the course if relevant: https://www.academia.edu/38283853/International_Human_Resource_Ma_Dennis_Briscoe_1_
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6. The textbook chapters relevant to this question are chapter 7,8 & 9.
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8. Please pay careful attention to what is required so that the questions are answered

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<3.

1. Please ensure APA 7 is used
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2. Please cite all sources used
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3. In the reference section please only reference the sources cited in the paper
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4. Please pay careful attention to the instructions and ensure each question is read and understood properly before writing
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5. Please pay careful attention to the grading rubric so that you have an idea as to how marks are allocated for each section
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6. Please refer to the textbook for this course if it is necessary. The link will be uploaded because the textbook file is too huge to be attached. https://dokumen.pub/business-ethics-decision-making-for-personal-integrity-amp-social-responsibility-4nbsped-1259417859-9781259417856.html

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<3.

1. Introduction and Background
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2. International Human Resource Strategy
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3. Comparative Analysis
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4. conclusion

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FORMAT STYLE: APA Read instructions for paper, topic: Performance Management: Li

FORMAT STYLE: APA Read instructions for paper, topic: Performance Management: Linking Rewards to Performance Scho

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HRM

Read chapter 2, “The Changing Role Of Talent Architects” by Ekta Vyas in Forbes

Read chapter 2, “The Changing Role Of Talent Architects” by Ekta Vyas in Forbes at https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2018/02/06/the-changing-role-of-talent-architects/#6f130f8e4e57
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Then, watch Dr. Dave Ulrich–The Future of HR on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57PmDk73u7I (16 minutes).
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How important is effective HR to an organization’s strategy? Explain.
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What do you see as some of the challenges of using HR to create value from the “outside in,” as Dr. Ulrich suggests? What should HR teams focus on to create such value?
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Read chapter 3, First, read “Data storytelling: The essential Data Science skill everyone needs” by Brent Dykes in Forbes at https://www.forbes.com/sites/brentdykes/2016/03/31/data-storytelling-the-essential-data-science-skill-everyone-needs/#cd7cc3052ad4
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Then, watch The beauty of data visualization on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Zg-C8AAIGg (18 minutes).
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Do you think a narrative is equally as important as data and visuals? Why or why not?
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Can you think of a time that data changed your perspective on something? Which was more important: the data itself or the way in which it was presented?

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You will create and post a scenario with the following information: Y

You will create and post a scenario with the following information:
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You are the Employee Relations Manager at an organization
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You just received an employee complaint through the EEOC (*you decide what the employee is claiming; i.e., Type)
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According to the complaint, the employee claims to have been “looked over” for promotion.
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All other parts of the scenario are up to you
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Requirements :
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Include what policy or practice the employee is claiming that was violated.